Engine Lifts

Engine lifts are hoists specifically designed to lift and transport large engines safely within a facility. Engine removal is very common in the agricultural, automotive, aerospace and marine industries while manufacturing, assembling, repairing or performing routine maintenance on powerful vehicles that are powered by a large, heavy engine.

Engine lifts are generally portable and able to quickly latch on or wrap around any size engine, lift it and move it into another area without any damage, if done correctly. Engine hoists are more likely to be hydraulically powered because of the required high weight capacity, but some are electric. They are usually of stand-alone construction and are composed of a metal frame, usually made of a steel grade. These hoists use either a metal chain or wire rope attached to a large, galvanized metal hook.

Most engines require the use of a harness, called a hoist sling, in order to be safely balanced and lifted. The sling is usually made of chains and hooks and may be complicated to attach around an engine that is inside of a large vehicle or craft. Without the sling, however, the hook has nothing to attach itself to and the engine will not move.

The process of moving an engine is slow, careful and requires safety measures and patience. Moving directions quickly could result in the whole hoist to fall over-a very expensive mistake that could cost a new engine. The engine should also not be lifted more than absolutely necessary. If a certain height is reached, the hoist will become unstable and risk falling over. There are 7 main steps in effectively hoisting an engine and moving it to another location.

First, the hoist must be positioned over the engine. The weight capacity must also be double checked to ensure the engine is not too heavy for the hoist to safely lift. The chains or wire rope must also be inspected each time. Sometimes, the engine itself will have anchor points that help determine where the hoist sling should be attached.

After the sling is secure around the engine, the hoist hook is attached and the engine is lifted no more than a couple inches. Then, the engine is raised so that it clears any obstacles, including the vehicle or craft. It is then slowly and gently moved into the new positioned and lowered until it touches the ground. Stabilizers are usually placed under the engine so that it can stay upright and balanced.